Posts Tagged ‘lure’

Northeastern Oklahoma Fishing Report July 3 to July 9

July 8, 2011 7:58 am
posted by Terry

Bass

Here’s a fishing report for Northeastern Oklahoma.  Several of the fishing reports show the fish are biting with different things.  Be sure to bring your baitcasting or spinning reel with you to bring home the catch of the day.

Bell Cow: July 3. Elevation below normal, water 85 and murky. Bass fair on spinnerbaits and plastic baits early and late. Catfish good on night crawlers and chicken liver at night. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County.

Chandler: July 3. Elevation below normal, water 86 and murky. Bass fair on plastic baits at night. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County.

Eucha: July 5. Elevation below normal, water 83 and dingy. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 10-12 ft. around brush and structure. Largemouth bass fair on buzz baits around grass beds early morning. Bluegill fair on crickets and worms around grass beds. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa.

Ft Gibson: July 1. Water level is 2 ft. below normal and steady. White bass good on white spinnerbaits and crankbaits below the dam while generating and in the main lake trolling the windy points. Catfish good on juglines baited with shad and whole sunfish. Largemouth bass good on buzz baits early and late in the shallows around rocky areas. Report submitted by Rick Stafford of Wagoner.

Grand: July 3. Elevation normal, water 80s and clear. Bass slow around drop-offs. White bass good on jigs below Pensacola Dam. Catfish good on juglines and trotlines baited with cut shad. Crappie fair on jigs in deeper water. Bluegill good on small jigs and worms in shallows. Report submitted by Kody Moore, game warden stationed in Delaware County.

Greenleaf: July 5. Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits, crankbaits and bill baits in creek channels, brush structure and along shorelines. Catfish good on fresh cut bait on bottom. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs in green, yellow and red around fishing docks and brush structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County.

Hudson: July 5. Elevation normal. Largemouth fair to good on crankbaits and plastic baits. Channel and blue catfish being caught on juglines and trotlines baited with cut bait and blood bait along river channels. Report submitted by Steve Loveland, game warden stationed in Rogers and Mayes counties.

Kaw: July 3. Catfish fair on fresh shad in the main lake early and late. Striped bass hybrids good trolling crankbaits and drifting shad by the dam. White bass good on spinnerbaits off of riprap. Catfish fair on shad and red worms behind the dam after dark. Report by David Rempe, game warden stationed in Grant and Kay counties.

Keystone: July 5. Water 85. Bass fair on soft plastic lures and diving plugs. White bass fair on rattletraps around points. Catfish fair on shad. Report submitted by Karlin Bailey, game warden stationed in Creek County.

Lower Illinois: July 5. Elevation normal, water 48 and murky. Largemouth bass fair on topwater lures all along the river. White bass fair on jigs and spinnerbaits at 1-2 ft. all along the river. Striped bass fair on live shad at 1-3 ft. all along the river. Channel catfish excellent on bottom all along the river. Crappie fair on jigs and spinnerbaits at 1-2 ft. all along the river. Trout good on flies at the surface, on rooster tails at 1-2 ft. and on Power Bait on bottom above Gore Landing and near the dam. Report submitted by D. Tracy, Town of Gore.

Spavinaw: July 5. Elevation slightly above normal, water 85 and dingy. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around the dam area. Largemouth bass fair on plastic baits. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa.

Tenkiller: July 4. Elevation normal and steady, water 80 and clear. Largemouth bass fair to good on plastic lizards in shallow water early and late. Catfish fair on juglines or flip-flops baited with shrimp or cut bait. Sunfish good on night crawlers around docks. Report by Monte Brooks, Cookson Village Resort.

Webbers Falls: July 5. Elevation normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and crankbaits along creek channels, riprap and brush structure. Catfish good on fresh cut bait and herring on bottom drifting. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around bridges and brush structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County.

Reported by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation

Did you like this? Share it:

Bass Fishing Knots Part I

July 4, 2011 9:16 am
posted by Terry

Trilene Knot

In bass fishing, there are numerous knots you can use to help catch your bass. These type of knot methods help to make catching fish a lot easier.

Many fishermen prefer the baitcasting reel in order to get a more accurate feel. A good type of bass knot to use is a trilene knot. It’s recommended for beginners because it’s a very simple and a dependable knot. Simply thread your line through the eye of the hook or lure then loop the thread around so it goes through the eye again. The key is to firmly but slowly pull the main lines so it gets to about a quarter inch in size. Next, hold the lure or hook in one hand while you hold the loop between the thumb and pointer finger with the hand. After this step is completed, take the tag line and wrap it around the main line at least 5 times. Guide the tag line around and back through the double loop above the eye then push the tag back through the larger loop. It’s important to pull the main line while holding the tag end. Make sure you wet your line. After this is done, clip off the tag end.

Did you like this? Share it:

Summer Catfish Hidey-Hole Tips

July 1, 2011 10:22 am
posted by Terry

    Channel Cat

  1. In rivers catfish hang around the riprap banks and in tailwaters below the dam.
  2. Catfish can also be found in deep holes below wing dams and in tributaries.
  3. In man-made lakes catfish can be found in flooded stock ponds and roadbeds.
  4. Catfish also like to hide in standing timber and around submerged humps.
  5. When fishing in heavy cover or a timber area, use a heavy duty pflueger baitcasting reel outfit.  A catfish can have the advantage if dependable tackle is not used in this fishing situation.
Did you like this? Share it:

Drift Fishing Tips For Catfish

June 30, 2011 9:11 am
posted by Terry

Channel Cat

  1. Outfit your boat with 4 to 6 heavy duty baitcasting reel outfits.  The rods should be at least an 8 feet in length.
  2. Use a 2 ounce sinker with live bait on a 6/0 hook.
  3. Next, adjust the rods so that the bait is near the bottom and the line is kept vertical.
  4. Lastly, in your boat, make sure the rods are perpendicular to the gunwhales and use a trolling motor to control the drift speed.

Drift fishing can help an angler catch catfish that are hiding in large flats, around boulders, logs, or other large obstructions in the river.

Did you like this? Share it:

Three Catfish Baits Tips

June 29, 2011 7:08 pm
posted by Terry

Blue Catfish

    Channel Cat

  1. Bait a pflueger baitcasting reel outfit with live bait (frogs, catalpa worms, shad, nightcrawlers or crayfish) when fishing for flathead catfish.
  2. Channel catfish prefer dead or prepared baits.  Bait your spinning reel outfit with any of the following:  limburger, cheese, doughballs, stinkbait, and chicken livers.
  3. Blue catfish will bite live, dead or prepared baits.  They are not picky eaters.

Flathead Catfish

Did you like this? Share it:

Largemouth Vision Fishing Tips

June 27, 2011 10:31 am
posted by Terry

Largemouth Bass

Like humans, largemouths depend upon their five senses for survival.  However, they depend mostly on their vision to find food.  According to research, these fish can see well in all directions.  The water clarity is the only thing that hinders them from seeing far.  In clear water, largemouth can see more than 20 feet.

To determine which bait or lure will work best for the angler, consider the following tips:

  1. Try using a lure that has some red in the coloring.  According to laboratory test, this color is recognized more by bass.
  2. When fishing in discolored water, use bright or fluorescent lure colors.
  3. In clear water, try using a dark or drab color lure or live bait.
Did you like this? Share it:

Catching A Paddlefish – Tips and Techniques

June 22, 2011 7:22 am
posted by Terry

PaddleFish

Paddlefish will be found in low current waters in all seasons except springtime. In the spring, which is the spawning season, they shift location to up stream areas where the water levels are higher. You can try your luck in catching paddlefish in both situations, although you will have better luck in the upstream moments.

Catching paddlefish is lots of fun, especially because you do not have to be a seasoned fisherman to do it. Another thing which makes it so much fun is the simple equipment used. You won’t need to invest in expensive equipment to snag this precious fish but you must keep it heavyweight. The paddlefish is huge, weighing over 200 pounds on average so your equipment must match up to this weight. With less than $200, you can assemble everything you need to go ‘paddle-fishing.’

Equipment needed
So what do you need? You need:
Baitcasting Reels
– Line
– Rod
– Hooks
– Gaffs
– Weights
A rod between 10 and 15 feet is okay. The longer it is, the further you will be able to cast. Any line would work, but a 30 pound monofilament works best for the paddlefish. The heavier the line, the better it will be at baitcasting. 5 ounce weights and 8/0 or 10/0 are good enough. The gaff will be used to land the fish.

The process
It all begins with tying up. Use a large, treble hook and leave up to 2 feet of line which you will tie to your weight. This will ensure that the weight is on one end and enhance the retrieving process.

While holding the spool with your thumb, turn the rod to the side so that the handle of the baitcasting reel is facing upward. Position yourself so that when you cast, you do not cast into the wind, otherwise a backlash will occur. When you are ready, cast your line, aiming for the opposite end from where you are. Release the thumb slowly without lifting it off the spool; otherwise the line will come off the reel. Baitcasting reels are great because they give you more control over the placement of the lure. They allow the lure to be placed just about anywhere paddlefish could be hiding or lying low.

Allow the weight to sink in for sometime and ready yourself for retrieving. Push your thumb down immediately the lure hits the water to keep the spool from spinning and then reel up the lure. Baitcasting reels have excellent braking system that you can quickly tighten if the spool continues spinning when your lure is already down. Repeat this process until you’ve covered the entire channel or moved closer to the shore. If you’ve nabbed your fish, bring it up the rod. You will have an easier time if you have someone else to help you here.

Tips
The reel position will be determined by the hand you intend to use to cast. If casting with your right-hand, keep the handle to the left side of the reel. If casting with the left arm, turn the handle to the right.

Baitcasting reels are prone to backlashing. Try not to jerk the rod or your line will become entangled in backlash. If you adjust the braking system correctly, it will control the spool.

Did you like this? Share it:

How to Use A Spinning Reel To Catch A Trout

June 21, 2011 11:27 am
posted by Terry

Trout

When choosing a rod/reel combo, the appropriate weight range is between 2 and 7 lbs. Beginners might be advised to stick to a closed face reel (a reel that has a button that allows for easy release of the line). The Pflueger Fishing Company makes several high quality reels and reel/rod combos for all skill levels, and something like the Pflueger President Spinning combo can offer the beginner a versatility and ease that are vital when starting out.

OK, Now comes the tricky part: a good cast.

Always cast slightly upstream and allow your bait to drift downstream. The current will make your bait appear lifelike and lure the trout.

Bring the rod tip behind you slowly, and press and hold the button on the fly reel. Quickly bring the rod tip around to directly in front of you and release the button in the middle of the cast. Be careful not to whip the rod to hard or your bait will get thrown off the hook.

Do not overcast. Think of rod as the hand on a clock, and keep your rod at 11 o’clock.

If you’ve done things correctly, your line should fly freely and land about 25-35 feet in front of you. Congratulations! Chances are, it’ll take a few casts before the fishes to start nibbling, but you’re well on your way!

Did you like this? Share it:

How to Catch a Spoonbill Fish

June 15, 2011 7:50 pm
posted by Terry

SpoonBill

The Spoonbill catfish is an extremely ancient fish having been on Earth for over three hundred million years. It is a large fish measuring as long as seven feet . Also known as a paddlefish it is not permitted to be fished in every state since it almost went extinct.
To successfully catch this fish it must be snagged. It is a rare thrill to drag a 10/0-12/0 three pronged hook and a five to sixteen ounce weight while trolling. This can be done by boat or by manpower. When using the baitcasting reel and rod, the rod should measure ten to twelve feet with a line weighing a minimum of sixty pounds. This is a seriously heavy and interesting fish to catch.
When a bending occurs at the tip of the rod, it is time to take a deep breathe, and start reeling in the spoonbill. Getting the three pronged hooked into the mouth properly may prove difficult to do but with practice a certain level of proficiency will start developing. Baitcasting reels provide more control over where to place the lure. They enable the angler to place lures right up next to logs.

Did you like this? Share it:

Northeastern Oklahoma Fishing Report Part #1

June 8, 2011 5:55 pm
posted by Terry
Largemouth Bass

Hey, looking at this report. We should all be fishing.  Looks like the fish are biting the catfish looks to be biting the best.  Stay tuned for the rest of the Northeastern Oklahoma Fishing Report.

Birch: June 6. Elevation normal, water low 70s and clear. Largemouth bass good on plastic baits. Channel catfish good on chicken liver and worms. Blue catfish good on shad. Report submitted by David Clay, game warden stationed in Osage County.

Copan: June 5. Elevation normal, water murky. Crappie good on minnows at 3-4 ft. near Osage Plains. Channel and blue catfish good on juglines baited with cut shad and sunfish near the river channel. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County.

Eucha: June 7. Elevation slightly above normal, water 82 and dingy. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around brush and structure at 10-12 ft. Largemouth bass fair on jerk baits. Bluegill sunfish fair on worms and crickets around grass beds. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa.

Ft. Gibson: June 5. Elevation 10 ft. and falling. Catfish fair on cut shad and whole shad. Report submitted by Rick Stafford in Wagoner.

Grand: June 7. Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal, water murky. Bass good on crankbaits and spinnerbaits in shallow water around points. White bass good on green and red jigs below the dam. Catfish good on juglines and rod and reels baited with fresh cut bait above Sailboat Bridge to Gray’s Ranch. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 10-15 ft. Report submitted by Kody Moore, game warden stationed in Delaware County.

Greenleaf: June 6. Elevation normal, water  clear. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits, crankbaits and jig and worms along shorelines, creek channels and brush structure. Catfish good on fresh cut bait on bottom. Crappie good on minnows and jigs in yellow, green and red around fishing docks and brush structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County.

Hulah: June 5. Elevation normal, water murky. Crappie fair on minnows at 3-6 ft. in Skull Creek. Channel catfish good on cut shad.. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County.

Report by Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation

Did you like this? Share it:

Recent Comments

    Fishing

    Contact Us
    8901 Marmora Road Glasgow,
    D04 89GR
    Freephone:       +1 800 559 6580
    E-mail:info@companyname.com