Posts Tagged ‘knot’

The Daiwa Saltiga SA-Z Spinning Reel

December 26, 2011 9:29 am
posted by Terry

The Daiwa Saltiga SA-Z is another great product, and it has many of the features that consumers love. This reel was designed to be one of the strongest on the market. The case has been thoroughly engineered, and it prevents contaminants from entering the housing. This is a major cause of damage to the reels. This reel features a sleek, elegant and clean design, and it works great on the water.

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The Daiwa Certate Spinning Reel

December 22, 2011 9:20 am
posted by Terry

The Daiwa Certate spinning reel is known for the four core concepts that define its engineering. It is modeled around a real engine that features endurance, control and customization. They introduced this reel to reduce friction. It functions smoothly, and this reel is known to bring in the line. This product can hold 110 yards of line, and it has an extremely light weight. This product was first introduced in Japan, but it is now available throughout the United States. It has an excellent, low gear ratio, and this allows the model to feature one of the best retrieves on the market.

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Central Oklahoma Fishing Report for Week of Aug 14

August 19, 2011 7:44 pm
posted by Terry

Walleye

Looking here we see the crappie is good late in the evening and at night.  Several fishing places are biting just a different at each place.  Be sure to bring your baitcasting reel and go fishing.

Arcadia: August 14. Elevation below normal. Channel catfish fair to good on slip corks with minnows and punchbait at 5-8 ft. and on stinkbait and punchbait in deeper channel water at night. Crappie good at night off docks and fair on minnows in the evenings. Report submitted by Chance Whiteley, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County.

Hefner: August 15.. Elevation below normal, water 85-93 and clear. Largemouth and smallmouth bass slow on crankbaits and jigs at 6-20 ft. along deep structure and rocky banks. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair on shad colored crankbaits, grubs and sassy shad at 2-10 ft. all around the lake when chasing shad. Channel and blue catfish fair on cut bait and prepared bait at 6-15 ft. along rocky shorelines and the dam. Flathead catfish slow on live bait at 15-30 ft. around the dam.. Crappie slow on minnows and jigs at 15-30 ft. around the dam. Walleye fair on crankbaits and grubs at 14-20 ft. around east points and the dam early. Sunfish and bluegill good on worms and small jigs along rocky banks. Report submitted by Lucky Lure Tackle.

Overholser: August 14. Elevation 9 ft. below normal, water murky. Channel catfish fair to good on cut shad, chicken liver, shrimp and hotdogs early and late and fair to good at gar hole. Report submitted by Joey Rushing, game warden stationed in Oklahoma and Canadian counties.

Wes Watkins: August 15. Elevation 5 ft. below normal, water 88 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits at 12-15 ft. in late evening. White bass fair to good trolling the main lake. Crappie fair on minnows around deep structure early morning. Report submitted by Mike France, game warden stationed in Pottawatomie County.

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Tips For Choosing A Fishing Line — Part IV

August 11, 2011 8:48 am
posted by Terry

Fishing Line

Fluorocarbon fishing lines are manufactured by using a carbon base and other materials and are used in fly fishing. This type of line is stiff and it will keep the shape of the spool. Many have complained that this type of line is brittle and breaks easily, especially in cold weather. The big advantage of using this line is that the line is invisible in the water. There are many different brands of these lines along with many different prices. It is hard to say what is best for the individual fisher. They just have to try one and test it out. The fluorocarbon fishing lines can be used with a baitcasting reel, how ever it is difficult to use.

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Tips For Choosing A Fishing Line — Part III

August 10, 2011 9:45 am
posted by Terry

Fishing Line

A Braided fishing line also known as a superline is much more common and has been used for decades. This type of line when knotted holds the knot. Its positive uses are that it is a powerful fishing line that does not stretch and will hold its own in power and strength. As good as this fishing line is the one drawback is that it is opaque in the water and the fish can visualize the line. Some anglers will knot a monofilament line to the end of a braded line, called the leader, in order to help make the line less visable to the fish. The braided fishing line can be used with baitcasing reels.

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Tips For Choosing A Fishing Line — Part I

August 8, 2011 1:35 pm
posted by Terry

Fishing Line

Fishing is one sport that men and women enjoy participating in. There is casual fishing and then the more serious anglers. While some do not care what kind of rod, reel, fishing line, bait, or tackle they use, others may take a more serious approach to this sport and want to use only the best fishing gear that money can buy in order to enhance their fishing experience. Will the type of fishing line that he or she decides on determine how successful that their fishing trip will be? Some anglers feel that the type of line used makes all the difference, while others are not quite sure.

Stay tuned as we look at the different types of fishing line.

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The Uni Knot

August 5, 2011 10:15 am
posted by Terry
Uni Knot

Uni Knot

The fourth knot to use with a baitcasting reel is the uni knot.

The uni knot is a basic knot and can be varied by the fisherman to meet pretty much any need, in fresh or salt water fishing. To tie the knot begin by running the line through the eye of the hook, at least 6” and fold it to make 2 parallel lines. Bring the end back towards the hook; next, make 6 turns with the tag around the double line and through the circle you formed. Pull the tag to tighten the line, then pull the standing line to slide up to the knot created against the eye. Pull until it is at the desired tightness, trim the tag end to ensure the knot doesn’t slip or come undone.

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The Trilene Knot

August 4, 2011 10:12 am
posted by Terry

Trilene Knot

The third knot to use with a baitcasting reel is the trilene knot.

The trilene knot is used for any purpose: snaps, hooks, connecting artificial lures, etc. The ease of tying the knot and design, offer a strong and dependable connection, and still retain 85-90% of original line strength. First, run one end of line through the eye of the hook, and back through the eye a second time, follow this by looping around the standing part 5 or 6 times. Next, thread the tag end between the eye and coils, and pull up tight for strength and trim the tag end. This knot is easy to tie, durable, and used for all casts.

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The Orvis Knot

August 3, 2011 10:08 am
posted by Terry

Orvis Knot

The second knot to use with a baitcasting reel is the orvis knot.

The orvis knot is for tying ring clips and snood clips, this knot allows for easy control of the length of the rig. To tie this knot first pass the end of the tippet through the eye of the hook, then round it back through the hoop you made. Next you will tag the end and wrap it around the second loop twice, followed by lubricating and tightening the knot. To finish it off trim the end tag. This knot allows for control of length and offers a strong knot, it is also used for tying flies.

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The Improved Clinch Knot

August 2, 2011 10:00 am
posted by Terry

Improved Clinch Knot

This is the first of several different knots to be used with a baitcasting reel.

This is one of the easier knots to tie, and is one of the main reasons it’s so popular for connecting monofilament to terminal tackle. This knot is best on lines of 20 pounds and under. To tie the proper knot, you will pass the line through the eye of the hook, swivel and lure. Then bring it back through and make five turns arond the standing line. Holding the coils, thread the end of the loop above the eye and through the larger loop. While pulling the coils, make sure they are in a spiral, and don’t overlap each other and slide it against the eye of the knot, lastly you will clip the tag end. – Although requiring a few steps, after a few trys, this is one of the simplest knots to make.

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