Posts Tagged ‘fishing reels’

The Albright Knot

July 29, 2011 10:53 am
posted by Terry

Albright Knot for Baitcasting Reel

This is a strong and viable knot. It is used to attach the fly line to the fly reel backing. Take a couple inches of line and make a loop. Run about ten inches of excess through the loop. Hold the loop and wrap the excess around both lines with the other hand, wrapping around ten times. Push the excess through the opposite side where it began so both lines’ excesses are adjacent. Pull the remainder through the loop, and tighten if necessary. The line knot is common, and is used before winding the baitcasting reel. It is a fly line to backing knot.

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The Nail Knot

July 27, 2011 2:47 pm
posted by Terry

Nail Knot For Fly Line

A common fly fishing knot, the ‘nail knot’ is a rudimentary must-have for the professional fisherman. It involves the attachment of a small object, such as a tube twice the diameter of the line, to the fly line itself, and then attaching the line to the backing. Place the object at the end of the fly line with about two inches of excess, making about a two inch loop at the weighted end of your leader. Pinch the loop to the object. Next, get the small end of the leader loop and wrap about five times around the object and actual line. Each ‘wrap’ should be at least one-half inch from the end of the fly line. Move the thumb forward to keep it from unwinding, and move the end of the leader through the tube from right to left. Remove the tube, and tighten the knot by tugging both ends of the leader. The idea is to make it more consistent with the fly line. Complete the knot by pulling the line through, trim the leader excess, and you’ve finished the nail knot. It is a leader to fly line knot.

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Bass Fishing Knots Part II

July 5, 2011 9:30 am
posted by Terry

Palomar Knot

Another great knot to use is the palomar. Using this knot with a pflueger baitcaster reel helps to have more stability when drawing out the cast as well as a great braking mechanism when you want to hold the fish in place. The palomar knot is a solid way to join fishing lines to swivels, snaps, and hooks. Also, the way the double knot is tied adds more security to the knot itself adding more strength for your loops. Simply double the line and form a loop making it around 4 inches long. Pass the end of the loop through the hook’s eye. Make sure to have a good grasp of the line with your thumb and finger while you grasp the loop with your free hand to help make an overhand knot. Put the hook through the loop and draw the line guiding the loop over the eyelet. Lastly, make sure the tag end of line is tightly knotted. Clip 1/4 of the tag end.

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Bass Fishing Knots Part I

July 4, 2011 9:16 am
posted by Terry

Trilene Knot

In bass fishing, there are numerous knots you can use to help catch your bass. These type of knot methods help to make catching fish a lot easier.

Many fishermen prefer the baitcasting reel in order to get a more accurate feel. A good type of bass knot to use is a trilene knot. It’s recommended for beginners because it’s a very simple and a dependable knot. Simply thread your line through the eye of the hook or lure then loop the thread around so it goes through the eye again. The key is to firmly but slowly pull the main lines so it gets to about a quarter inch in size. Next, hold the lure or hook in one hand while you hold the loop between the thumb and pointer finger with the hand. After this step is completed, take the tag line and wrap it around the main line at least 5 times. Guide the tag line around and back through the double loop above the eye then push the tag back through the larger loop. It’s important to pull the main line while holding the tag end. Make sure you wet your line. After this is done, clip off the tag end.

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Fishing For White Bass

June 13, 2011 10:10 pm
posted by Terry

White Bass

White bass are easy to catch once they have been located.  In late spring, these fish tend to be caught around sandy flats, deep riprap banks, and by large boulders that break the water current.  Besides fishing from the bank, many anglers rely on trolling.  Trolling allows the angler to use a depth finder which makes it easier to locate and catch the fish.

To catch white bass, use a good spinning reel outfit with 4 to 8 pound mono line.  As for bait, try using a jig.  Live bait is not a requirement.  White bass bite in the early morning hours.  Last but not least, watch for circling gulls.  Circling gulls indicate that schools of white bass are feeding nearby.

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Four Fishing Tips for Sunfish

June 6, 2011 3:15 pm
posted by Terry

    Bluegill Perch

  1. When fishing for sunfish use a spinning reel with a four pound monoline.
  2. Sunfish tend to hang out by deep water docks, piers and around weedy dams with a slow current.
  3. If fishing by boat, use a depth finder.  A depth finder helps the angler locate the fish quicker and easier.
  4. Sunfish can be caught with a worm, cricket, or a lure such as a curly-tail jig.
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How To Clean A Abu Garcia Revo Baitcasting Reel

May 11, 2011 11:33 am
posted by Terry

It’s very important to do routine maintenance on your Abu Garcia Revo baitcasting reel regularly in order to keep it working at it’s best. It only takes a few moments, and in the long run it is going to save you money because you will prolong the life of the product.

After every fishing trip it’s important to take a slightly damp cloth and wipe down the outside of your baitcasting reel. Once it’s wiped down completely then you should take a second cloth that is completely dry to remove any of the damp residue from the casing.

The makers of the Abu Garcia Revo also make their own lubrication product. It’s a very good one to use, but if you have another favorite brand you can use that as well. Before this high quality reel is stored it’s important to put a few drops of lubrication into the gears, the handle, and the spool shaft. Don’t overdo it. Just a little bit of lubrication will work it’s way through the moving parts as you spin the handle a few times.

Place the fully cleaned reel into a soft cloth bag and store it in a dry place until the next time it is used.

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Learning to Use Baitcasting Reels

April 20, 2011 1:44 pm
posted by A-Reel-Good-Time

Like many anglers, I started out using a spincast reel. The closed face spincast reel provides trouble free casting- who doesn’t want that? Still, I was curious about baitcasting reels. I figured that there must be some sort of advantage to using a baitcasting reel if so many fishermen I respect use them.

I called up a buddy who has several baitcasting reels and asked him to show me the ropes. Let me tell you, a baitcasting reel is not easy to master, at all! The effort put into learning to use a baitcasting reel is worth it. I loved being able to feel every play; you get a better sense of what is going on below the water. As a side note, you don’t have to replace your lures; I use crank baits, spinners, and top waters with my baitcast reel.

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Spotlight On: Ambassadeur Abu Garcia

April 11, 2011 3:44 pm
posted by A-Reel-Good-Time

The Abu Garcia Company was founded in Sweden in 1921, originally as a Swiss watch factory. Fortunately for us, the owner’s son was an avid angler. He started researching and developing fishing reel line, releasing the product to the pubic in 1941. In 1952 the company released the famous Ambassadeur Abu Garcia.

Nearly seventy years later, the company still manufactures the famous Ambassadeur and other high quality Abu Garcia fishing reels. What is remarkable is how little change the reels have undergone. The few modifications include improved drag washers, additional bearings, and no-slip spools. When you get it right the first time there isn’t much need for change!

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