Archive for the ‘Lures’ Category

Bass Fishing Knot Part III

July 6, 2011 9:40 am
posted by Terry

Blood Knot

The Blood Knot is a more complex looking knot, but it’s great for connections. The blood knot method is a way to bring two pieces of monofilament together in one tying method. To start the process of making the knot, simply overlap the end of two strands so that joining and twisting them is much easier. You should do this about 10 turns to make sure both monofilaments are secure. After this step, separate one of the center twists and place the two ends through the middle of the space. Lastly, pull the knot together and clip off the excess ends.

Try this knot out the next time with your baitcasting reel outfit.

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Bass Fishing Knots Part II

July 5, 2011 9:30 am
posted by Terry

Palomar Knot

Another great knot to use is the palomar. Using this knot with a pflueger baitcaster reel helps to have more stability when drawing out the cast as well as a great braking mechanism when you want to hold the fish in place. The palomar knot is a solid way to join fishing lines to swivels, snaps, and hooks. Also, the way the double knot is tied adds more security to the knot itself adding more strength for your loops. Simply double the line and form a loop making it around 4 inches long. Pass the end of the loop through the hook’s eye. Make sure to have a good grasp of the line with your thumb and finger while you grasp the loop with your free hand to help make an overhand knot. Put the hook through the loop and draw the line guiding the loop over the eyelet. Lastly, make sure the tag end of line is tightly knotted. Clip 1/4 of the tag end.

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Bass Fishing Knots Part I

July 4, 2011 9:16 am
posted by Terry

Trilene Knot

In bass fishing, there are numerous knots you can use to help catch your bass. These type of knot methods help to make catching fish a lot easier.

Many fishermen prefer the baitcasting reel in order to get a more accurate feel. A good type of bass knot to use is a trilene knot. It’s recommended for beginners because it’s a very simple and a dependable knot. Simply thread your line through the eye of the hook or lure then loop the thread around so it goes through the eye again. The key is to firmly but slowly pull the main lines so it gets to about a quarter inch in size. Next, hold the lure or hook in one hand while you hold the loop between the thumb and pointer finger with the hand. After this step is completed, take the tag line and wrap it around the main line at least 5 times. Guide the tag line around and back through the double loop above the eye then push the tag back through the larger loop. It’s important to pull the main line while holding the tag end. Make sure you wet your line. After this is done, clip off the tag end.

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Summer Catfish Hidey-Hole Tips

July 1, 2011 10:22 am
posted by Terry

    Channel Cat

  1. In rivers catfish hang around the riprap banks and in tailwaters below the dam.
  2. Catfish can also be found in deep holes below wing dams and in tributaries.
  3. In man-made lakes catfish can be found in flooded stock ponds and roadbeds.
  4. Catfish also like to hide in standing timber and around submerged humps.
  5. When fishing in heavy cover or a timber area, use a heavy duty pflueger baitcasting reel outfit.  A catfish can have the advantage if dependable tackle is not used in this fishing situation.
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Drift Fishing Tips For Catfish

June 30, 2011 9:11 am
posted by Terry

Channel Cat

  1. Outfit your boat with 4 to 6 heavy duty baitcasting reel outfits.  The rods should be at least an 8 feet in length.
  2. Use a 2 ounce sinker with live bait on a 6/0 hook.
  3. Next, adjust the rods so that the bait is near the bottom and the line is kept vertical.
  4. Lastly, in your boat, make sure the rods are perpendicular to the gunwhales and use a trolling motor to control the drift speed.

Drift fishing can help an angler catch catfish that are hiding in large flats, around boulders, logs, or other large obstructions in the river.

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Three Catfish Baits Tips

June 29, 2011 7:08 pm
posted by Terry

Blue Catfish

    Channel Cat

  1. Bait a pflueger baitcasting reel outfit with live bait (frogs, catalpa worms, shad, nightcrawlers or crayfish) when fishing for flathead catfish.
  2. Channel catfish prefer dead or prepared baits.  Bait your spinning reel outfit with any of the following:  limburger, cheese, doughballs, stinkbait, and chicken livers.
  3. Blue catfish will bite live, dead or prepared baits.  They are not picky eaters.

Flathead Catfish

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Catfish Facts

June 28, 2011 5:50 pm
posted by Terry

Channel Cat

Its catfishing season!  Catfish are found in water temperatures ranging from 70-85 degrees.  They can reach weight of 50 to 100 lbs and bringing them in can be a challenge.  Catfish can put up a fight, so its best to have quality tackle.

Choosing quality tackle will depend on the type of catfish being caught.  Channel, flathead, white and blue catfish are the most common species.  When fishing for channel or white cat on a clean bottom river, use a medium power pflueger spinning reel outfit with a 14lb mono line.  For blues or flatheads, a pflueger heavy baitcasting outfit with a 50lb line will be much studier if fishing in heavy cover.

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Largemouth Vision Fishing Tips

June 27, 2011 10:31 am
posted by Terry

Largemouth Bass

Like humans, largemouths depend upon their five senses for survival.  However, they depend mostly on their vision to find food.  According to research, these fish can see well in all directions.  The water clarity is the only thing that hinders them from seeing far.  In clear water, largemouth can see more than 20 feet.

To determine which bait or lure will work best for the angler, consider the following tips:

  1. Try using a lure that has some red in the coloring.  According to laboratory test, this color is recognized more by bass.
  2. When fishing in discolored water, use bright or fluorescent lure colors.
  3. In clear water, try using a dark or drab color lure or live bait.
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Relatives of the Largemouth Bass

June 24, 2011 10:15 am
posted by Terry

Largemouth Bass

The largemouth bass may be the favorite fish of bass anglers, but it has several relatives.  So don’t be surprised if one of them happens to grab the bait from the line on your Pflueger spinning reel.

The largemouth has at least five relatives.  These relatives include the:  Smallmouth, Spotted, Suwannee, and the Guadalupe bass.  All of these bass can be found in the in the same lakes and streams as largemouths.  Their coloring and markings are very distinguished, so don’t confuse them with a largemouth.

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Catching a World’s Record Bass

June 23, 2011 12:15 pm
posted by Terry

Largemouth Bass

The current work record is a 22 lb 4 ounce largemouth that was caught in Montgomery Lake, Georgia.  This largemouth was cross between a Florida and Northern largemouth.  To catch a largemouth this size, an angler would need to use a heavy duty Pflueger baitcasting reel with a heavy abrasion resistant line. Having the right tackle can make the difference between a world record and a second place.

However, for the angler that wants to catch largemouth but not set the world record, a baitcasting or spinning reel will work just fine.  Basically if the angler is fishing around a weedy or brushy area, it’s best to use the baitcasting reel.  A baitcasting reel will allow the angler to place the lure or bait next to the brush.  The reel allows a more precise cast but the angler may need to practice casting with this reel.

If the angler is fishing in a clear bottom lake or shallow stream then a spinning reel will do just fine.  Just watch the weight of the line.  As long as the fish don’t weight more than the weight of the line, the angler should not have a problem of landing the largemouth.

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